EAC Releases 2014 Election Administration and Voting Survey Comprehensive Report

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The EAC recently released its 2014 Election Administration and Voting Survey Comprehensive Report – a 311-page document that may be accessed in its entirety by clicking here.

By way of background: Since 2004, the EAC has used the Election Administration and Voting Survey to collect data on voting, elections and election-related matters.

This is the sixth collection of data released, and for the first time, the info was used to create three distinct reports:

1. A federally mandated report on the impact of the National Voter Registration Act.

2. A mandated report on the impact of the Uniformed and Overseas Citizen Absentee Voting act, and

3. A report summarizing additional findings, including information on how Americans cast their ballots, and how state and local officials conduct elections.

Findings regarding the National Voter Registration Act showed an uptick in voters wishing to cast ballots.

Here were some interesting tidbits:

  • A total 190 million registered voters were reported for the November 2014 midterm elections. That is an increase of about 3.2 percent over the 2010 midterm cycle.
  • There were 16.6 million new voter registration applications in 2014 – an increase of more than 2 million from the 2010 midterm election cycle.
  • Nearly 297,000 voters younger than 18 pre-registered to vote in the 2014 midterm elections (those who would be 18 by Election Day). During the 2010 midterm election cycle, the number of pre-registered voters was just 169,000.
  • States found invalid (or otherwise rejected) 984,000 voter registration applications. That is down from about 1.3 million rejected applications during the 2010 midterm election cycle.

But that’s just a portion of the great data included in the report. Check it out for yourself at the link above – and let us know what you think! Feel free to leave your opinion in the comments section below!

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